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The gift Global Voice Media offers to our audience is a series of New Zealand’s most popular dedicated podcasts on topics such as technology, business and entertainment.

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One Thousand Ropes (Rated M, Violence & content that may disturb 1.38 mins) Directed by Tusi Tamasese ★★★★ Reviewed by Wal Reid

Given New Zealand’s dismal domestic violence record in the modern world, parallels drawn to a Polynesian Once Were Warriors would be grossly unfair, however director/writer Tusi Tamasese’s portrayal of ‘love lost’ is wonderfully brought to life on the silver screen in One Thousand Ropes.

Seeing this film has given me a glimpse of hope in the local film industry. Yes, Pork Pie & Poi E are excellent example of quality and while movies like Moonlight may be today’s metric for acting (not withstanding the annoying La-La Land) Kiwi movies like Tamasese’s are serious contenders for higher accolades, especially in the International arena.

The story revolves around midwife Maea the a (Uelese Petaia) an unlikely protagonist given his violent past as an abusive husband/fighter called Lion, he in turn seeks restorative redemption from his daughter Llisa (Frankie Adams) heavily pregnant and abused by her boyfriend, however Paea must wrestle with past ghost (Sima Urele) from his past and the pressure to avenge his daughter’s perpetrator to achieve this.

The film hinges on its natural acting ability, which I found a much higher calibre than a lot of it’s Oscar nominated counterparts. Its a slow burn film, but don’t be fooled by its gentle amble there is satisfaction for those who indulge its visual and aural beauty.

The Samoan/English subtlety is lauded as the story pulls in the viewer with Petaia’s acting pivotal to the unfolding storyline. Petaia is stoic in the role as patriarch Maea as the sometimes shocking but poignant visuals are thrown on screen, the sometime demented outbursts or close-up shots of heavily pregnant puku are reminders of a sometimes cruel but realistic outlook on life in modern day New Zealand.

Tim Webber’s haunting soundtrack is a feature of the film, while Leon Narby’s watchful gaze deliciously capture’s fictitious world it revealing it’s there is a movie you must see this year, then One Thousand Ropes is that film. It’s a timely reminder that all is well with the local film industry and that bilingual films are on the rise – About time, I say.

One Thousand Ropes (Rated M, Violence & content that may disturb 1.38 mins) Directed by Tusi Tamasese ★★★★ Reviewed by Wal Reid

Given New Zealand’s dismal domestic violence record in the modern world, parallels drawn to a Polynesian Once Were Warriors would be grossly unfair, however director/writer Tusi Tamasese’s portrayal of ‘love lost’ is wonderfully brought to life on the silver screen in One Thousand Ropes.

Seeing this film has given me a glimpse of hope in the local film industry. Yes, Pork Pie & Poi E are excellent example of quality and while movies like Moonlight may be today’s metric for acting (not withstanding the annoying La-La Land) Kiwi movies like Tamasese’s are serious contenders for higher accolades, especially in the International arena.

The story revolves around midwife Maea the a (Uelese Petaia) an unlikely protagonist given his violent past as an abusive husband/fighter called Lion, he in turn seeks restorative redemption from his daughter Llisa (Frankie Adams) heavily pregnant and abused by her boyfriend, however Paea must wrestle with past ghost (Sima Urele) from his past and the pressure to avenge his daughter’s perpetrator to achieve this.

The film hinges on its natural acting ability, which I found a much higher calibre than a lot of it’s Oscar nominated counterparts. Its a slow burn film, but don’t be fooled by its gentle amble there is satisfaction for those who indulge its visual and aural beauty.

The Samoan/English subtlety is lauded as the story pulls in the viewer with Petaia’s acting pivotal to the unfolding storyline. Petaia is stoic in the role as patriarch Maea as the sometimes shocking but poignant visuals are thrown on screen, the sometime demented outbursts or close-up shots of heavily pregnant puku are reminders of a sometimes cruel but realistic outlook on life in modern day New Zealand.

Tim Webber’s haunting soundtrack is a feature of the film, while Leon Narby’s watchful gaze deliciously capture’s fictitious world it revealing it’s there is a movie you must see this year, then One Thousand Ropes is that film. It’s a timely reminder that all is well with the local film industry and that bilingual films are on the rise – About time, I say.

Adele Concert Review – Mt Smart 23/03/2017

What a night – it was a most excellent spectacle. After getting myself versed with Adele on Spotify during the day, I was match fit for tonight’s gig.

After seeing the success of the Aussie Tour on the news and her disdain shown at the concert security guard and bugs in Australia, my interest was piqued as to what she would get up to here on her first Tour in New Zealand.

“I was sweating my titties off in Australia, your weather is much better” she joked, as she paraded up and down the giant stage almost to a work-out pace, waving and cajoling the excited Auckland audience.

Whether she was belting out “Hello, from the other side” or having go at our local bug life, remarking at one beetle on stage as “ a lonesome little fucker” it was clear from the outset British singer Adele’s potty-mouth humorous life stories had struck a chord with Kiwi audiences.

She dazzled and quickly connected with the crowd adding how appreciative she was after she had “heard them” them all night. As she opened with Hello, her voice was captivating from the first note, the song a massive opening statement.

Under the mild Auckland night air, she looked every bit the diva, resplendid in erubescent sequined dress, channelling her “Inner Ariel” on the James Bond theme song Skyfall, even going far as to suggest she nearly turned it down telling film makers “No” her favourite word, adding she is “lazy”.

The stage was a behemoth of a rig, easily one of the most impressive set ups I have witnessed. Towering above the sold out crowd, the smart lighting and impressive sound system pampered to the singers every whim.

Her image flashing from every 360 degree angle while her band and backing singers rotated on the centre artist stage – it was every bit the spectacle were expecting – plus more.

Hometown Glory with its time lapsed images of Auckland was a nice touch, while perennial favourites Rumour Has It, Chasing Pavements and Rolling In The Deep were delivered with such gusto it was hard to tell if it was the singer or a backing track playing.

The best part of the concert is Adele herself. Her thick-as-lard accent, relaxed style and amiable cackle is probably what resounds with Kiwi audiences. Her honesty is as brutal as her love for people is apparent by her pre-song banter, which she is well known for.

“Do you guys get Neighbours here, do you like it?” as a resounding “No” echoed around the stadium, her response of feigned surprise comically captured on the big screen.

She even had time to reflect on her “hometown” London as she remembered those who had fallen in yesterday’s terrorist attack, the singer accommodating a young fan with a selfie, as she invited her to the stage to help her ‘get rid of the beetles’, the singer asking her guardian “Did you get that?”

Maybe the Kiwi bugs got more than their fair share of “air time”, but there are enough surprises to keep even the most fastidious fan engaged. when Adele says “See you on the weekend,” you expect good things will happen – ah, that cackle though

Power Rangers (M, violence 2.04 hours) Directed by Dean Isrealite ★★★★ Reviewed by Jarred Tito

Go Go Power Rangers!” Well it’s all on again. The third Power Rangers movie has finally landed. And wow this is one to look out for. I’m guessing this film will storm the big screens with an explosive splash down. I’m also quite sure that this installment will delight Power Ranger fans the world over.

It’s full of all of the cool stuff that saw the TV show banned from New Zealand television in the 90s. Yes, there are the fight scenes and dangerous shenanigans which could mislead the younger audiences. However, in my opinion, there is nothing too alarming in any of the choreographed sequences. Each are quite technical and way out of reach of young imitators. Having said that, there are plenty of positive role modeling traits such as, working as a team, putting others before yourself etc. Which could make up for the other stuff. Well you be the judge.

This is a reboot so expect an introduction story to how the Power Ranger super hero quintet began. Also, expect a fair amount of teenage drama including the ‘coming of age’ themes that also find their way into this film. But don’t be put off by that, Ranger fans, because that side of things is done quite well. To my surprise, the movie does take its time to develop the characters including individual back stories which are quite good and at times worthy of a laugh or two and even tug on the heart strings.

There’s also plenty of action too, which is mixed well with the CGI, and a level that you would expect from Transformers or any of the Marvel franchise. This really feels like the big one for the Power Rangers. It’s fun, well-paced and loaded with heaps of iconic Power Ranger stuff that will leave you breathless.

Dacre Montgomery makes a great leader of the five. He plays a role which is actually not too unlike Captain James T Kirk in the reboot of Star-Trek. He is very watchable and really is key to making this film cool and relevant. Bryan Cranston, who plays Zordon, does well in his part too. He brings a much-needed voice of reason which helped me get into the whole believability of teens saving the world. All of the usual foes are in there as well which should be expected.

This film certainly earns a definite power plus from me. I certainly do recommend it to any Power Ranger fan and anyone one else that enjoys a good hero movie. It’s both fun and action packed with some heart. If the kids are in the nagging stage about seeing this one parents, it’s for good reason. They are going to love this one so please do feel free to take a chance on it. They’ll love you for it. You might even find yourself getting a kick out of it too.

Power Rangers (M, violence 2.04 hours) Directed by Dean Isrealite ★★★★ Reviewed by Jarred Tito

Go Go Power Rangers!” Well it’s all on again. The third Power Rangers movie has finally landed. And wow this is one to look out for. I’m guessing this film will storm the big screens with an explosive splash down. I’m also quite sure that this installment will delight Power Ranger fans the world over.

It’s full of all of the cool stuff that saw the TV show banned from New Zealand television in the 90s. Yes, there are the fight scenes and dangerous shenanigans which could mislead the younger audiences. However, in my opinion, there is nothing too alarming in any of the choreographed sequences. Each are quite technical and way out of reach of young imitators. Having said that, there are plenty of positive role modeling traits such as, working as a team, putting others before yourself etc. Which could make up for the other stuff. Well you be the judge.

This is a reboot so expect an introduction story to how the Power Ranger super hero quintet began. Also, expect a fair amount of teenage drama including the ‘coming of age’ themes that also find their way into this film. But don’t be put off by that, Ranger fans, because that side of things is done quite well. To my surprise, the movie does take its time to develop the characters including individual back stories which are quite good and at times worthy of a laugh or two and even tug on the heart strings.

There’s also plenty of action too, which is mixed well with the CGI, and a level that you would expect from Transformers or any of the Marvel franchise. This really feels like the big one for the Power Rangers. It’s fun, well-paced and loaded with heaps of iconic Power Ranger stuff that will leave you breathless.

Dacre Montgomery makes a great leader of the five. He plays a role which is actually not too unlike Captain James T Kirk in the reboot of Star-Trek. He is very watchable and really is key to making this film cool and relevant. Bryan Cranston, who plays Zordon, does well in his part too. He brings a much-needed voice of reason which helped me get into the whole believability of teens saving the world. All of the usual foes are in there as well which should be expected.

This film certainly earns a definite power plus from me. I certainly do recommend it to any Power Ranger fan and anyone one else that enjoys a good hero movie. It’s both fun and action packed with some heart. If the kids are in the nagging stage about seeing this one parents, it’s for good reason. They are going to love this one so please do feel free to take a chance on it. They’ll love you for it. You might even find yourself getting a kick out of it too.

NZ Tech Podcast 326: Electric Kiwi, Uber Eats Auckland, IS Apple doing Augmented Reality in NZ and Lyft about to launch here?

Apple employing Wellington creative talent, tasting Uber Eats in NZ, Is Lyft is launching in NZ, Snap Spectacles Review, Super Mario Run Android, Microsoft launches Bookings service*, Electric Kiwi story and Dr Michelle Dickinson’s science comedy podcast.

Hosted by Paul Spain (@paulspain) and this week’s guests were Luke Blincoe (CEO, Electric Kiwi) and Michelle Dickinson.
*Update: Microsoft’s Booking app/service is currently limited to US

Get the Podcast here:

You can keep current with our latest NZ Tech Podcast updates via Twitter @NZTechPodcast, the NZ Tech Podcast website or the facebook page.

NZ Business Podcast 26: Linda Jenkinson – Global Innovator

Linda Jenkinson was the second Kiwi ever to ever float a company on the Nasdaq stock exchange. Currently a director of Air New Zealand, today Linda shares her story and insights from her adventures as a business innovator.

Get the Podcast here:

You can keep current with our latest NZ Business Podcast updates via Twitter @NZ_Business, the NZBusinessPodcast.com website.

NZ Tech Podcast 325: NZ Tech Podcast 325: Exploding Headphones, Philippines Tech, Grab Taxi vs Uber, WhatsApp compromised

Paul Spain reports in from Philippines – covering what’s happening in the local tech world along with news of exploding headphones aboard a flight to Melbourne, Grab Taxi vs Uber, WhatsApp security issues plus both Microsoft and Google go after Slack.

Get the Podcast here:

You can keep current with our latest NZ Tech Podcast updates via Twitter @NZTechPodcast, the NZ Tech Podcast website or the facebook page.

NZ Tech Podcast 325: Exploding Headphones, Philippines Tech, Grab Taxi vs Uber, WhatsApp compromised

Paul Spain reports in from Philippines – covering what’s happening in the local tech world along with news of exploding headphones aboard a flight to Melbourne, Grab Taxi vs Uber, WhatsApp security issues plus both Microsoft and Google go after Slack.

Get the Podcast here:

You can keep current with our latest NZ Tech Podcast updates via Twitter @NZTechPodcast, the NZ Tech Podcast website or the facebook page.